In response to our changing climate and the expansion of Penrith City, Penrith City Council is investing in substantial green infrastructure to ensure Penrith and its greater community can live comfortably and actively engage in all that our City has to offer.

The Greening our City project is an exciting project that will future proof our City in a way that will have long-lasting positive benefits. We identified in our Cooling the City Strategy the need to increase cooling across the City, and Greening our City achieves that with the planting of trees in various locations across the community.

In response to recent heat studies, Council is actively working to protect our City from rising temperatures and one of the ways we’re achieving this is by planting trees to help reduce average temperatures over time. Taking action to cool the City is essential in Penrith, especially given the increasing heat across Western Sydney during summer. It also helps reduce the Heat Island Effect.

Penrith Council is the proud recipient of funding from the NSW Government’s Greening our City grant.

Research highlights the benefits of trees in urban environments which include:

  • capturing air pollution and stormwater runoff
  • increasing habitat for wildlife
  • the cooling benefits of creating shade
  • the scientific processes of evapotranspiration
  • increased property values

With this grant funding and Council contributions, Penrith Council has been able to expand its tree planting projects to take place in streets, parks, industrial estates, and major corridors across multiple locations across the Local Government Area in 2022.

Green Streets

Project information

Trees have been shown to improve mental well-being by increasing people’s connection with nature and their physical health by providing a welcoming environment for a range of outdoor activities.

Funding for this project will see 5,000 trees planted along nature strips of residential streets, parks, and reserves across Penrith’s most eastern suburbs including Colyton, Erskine Park, North St Marys, Oxley Park, St Clair, and St Marys. These suburbs were strategically selected by Penrith Council based on the potential risk heat poses to our communities.

Factors contributing to this decision include heat mapping to identify hot spots, levels of tree canopy, and the demographic of communities to ensure the safety and well-being of those most likely to have their health impacted by heat.

Undoubtedly, many residents within these suburbs recall the negative impacts of temperatures above 49 degrees Celsius during the summer of 2019. Planting trees can reduce temperatures inside the home by 2 degrees Celsius; this figure increases for homeowners that take advantage of other passive cooling strategies like using light colours on roofing and external walls to limit heat absorption on these surfaces. In addition, increasing shade across these suburbs will immediately benefit thermal comfort levels, making it easier for communities to go about their daily living.

Council is looking forward to sharing the long-term benefits of this project with our residents. Not only will planting trees help to create cooler and more livable streets, but they will also add to the beauty of our parks and vibrant recreational spaces for years to come.

Planting has already commenced throughout many of the selected parks listed in the above suburbs. We have created a list of parks and reserves where tree planting will occur.

Our contractors will begin planting along the nature strips of pre-selected residential streets in Erskine Park, followed by St Clair in the coming months.

Penrith Council’s expert landscape architects have worked alongside our contractors to determine the right tree for the right place. This means that careful consideration has been given to ensure the benefits of planting on mass is experienced while accounting for factors such as overhead powerlines and underground utilities, safety and visibility for road users and pedestrians, and seasonal variations in temperature. Click the link above to find out further information about the species selection process.

In conjunction with these projects, Council will be hosting engagement activities to promote urban greening in the community and at home where you will be able to connect with Council staff about the tree work happening in your area. Take a look at the events section of this page for more information.

Green Streets — Erskine Park

Learn about the trees we're planting at Erskine Park.

Tree Species

Erskine Park trees

Wondering what tree species we're planting as part of our Green Streets project? Check out the list below.

Blackwood (Acacia Melanoxylon)

This tree is expected to grow up to 12m in Erskine Park. It's an attractive Australian tree that has silvery foliage and produces golden balls of fluffy flowers in spring, attracting birds and butterflies.

Trident Maple (Acer Buegerianum)

In Erskine Park, this tree is expected to grow up to 7m. In spring, the Trident Maple’s leaves are a beautiful coppery red that changes to a glossy dark green in summer that turns to a brilliant greenish-red and orange in autumn.

Willow Bottlebrush (Callistemon Salignus)

This tree is expected to grow up to 4m. A small native evergreen tree with soft green elongated leaves featuring pale, pink-toned new growth and papery bark. Creamy white to yellow flower brushes appear in spring, followed by small seed pods that sit tightly along branches.

Cimmaron Green Ash Tree (Fraxinus Pennsylvanica Cimmzan ‘Cimmaron’)

In Erskine Park, this tree is expected to grow up to 8m. An exotic deciduous tree with thick deep-green leaves and dark grey bark. Leaves change colour to vibrant tones of orange and bronze in autumn before falling.

Jacaranda (Jacaranda Mimosifolia)

In Erskine Park, this tree is expected to grow up to 10m. A gorgeous deciduous tree with bright green, feathery and fern-like leaves that turn yellow before falling from the tree. The tree produces beautiful trumpet-shaped purple clusters of flowers from spring to summer before producing seed pods.

Golden Rain Tree (Koelreuteria Paniculata)

In Erskine Park, this tree is expected to grow up to 8m. A deciduous tree with green leaves which turn bronze to gold in autumn before falling. In summer, chains of gorgeous bright yellow flowers are produced, followed by papery lantern-like seed pods which hang in clusters.

Crepe Myrtle (Lagerstroemia Indica Var. Indian Summer ‘Lipan’)

This tree is expected to grow up to 4m. A gorgeous deciduous tree with attractive mottled bark. Its dark green leaves turn coppery-brown and bright red in autumn before falling. Pale pink flowers are produced in mid-late summer.

Crepe Myrtle (Lagerstroemia Indica Var. Indian Summer ‘Natchez’)

In Erskine Park, this tree is expected to grow up to 5m. A spectacular deciduous tree with attractive patterned bark. Dark green summer leaves turn reddish-orange in autumn before falling. Beautiful white flowers are produced throughout summer and autumn.

Brush Box (Lophostemon Confertus)

This tree is expected to grow up to 11m. An evergreen Australian tree that provides good shade due to its dense covering of dark green, leathery leaves. It produces small white fluffy flowers in spring and summer before seed capsules are formed.

Callery Pear (Pyrus Calleryana)

This tree is expected to grow up to 8m. An exotic deciduous tree featuring glossy dark green leaves that turn a brilliant yellow and red through autumn. The tree has a narrow pyramid shape with branches reaching upwards. In spring clusters of beautiful tiny white flowers bloom all over the tree followed by small round fruits.

Ornamental Pear (Pyrus Ussuriensis)

This tree is expected to grow up to 7m. A medium-sized deciduous exotic tree with densely spreading glossy green leaves. Over autumn these leaves change to vibrant citrus tones of lemon yellows, lime greens, and blood oranges.

Paper Bark (Melaleuca Stypheliodes)

This tree is expected to grow up to 5m. A medium-sized native evergreen tree with a rounded head. The tree trunk has white to light brown papery bark that peels in layers. It features finely textured dark green pointed spiky leaves and fine, small, creamy bottle brush-like flowers in spring and summer.

Water or Kanooka Gum (Tristaniopsis Laurina ‘Luscious’)

This tree is expected to grow up to 8m. An evergreen Australian tree with attractive bark. The leaves are dark green, shiny and large. The new leaf growth is a distinctive copper colour. It bears cream to orange-yellow scented flowers in summer before producing seed capsules.

Chinese Elm (Ulmus Parvifolia)

This tree is expected to grow up to 6m. A neatly structured semi-deciduous tree, the tree features a delicate scaly bark and has dark green leaves that turn to shades of bronze and gold in autumn and often remain on their branches throughout winter.

Weeping Lilly Pilly (Waterhousia Floribunda)

This tree is expected to grow up to 8m. A medium to a large native evergreen tree with a lush, beautiful weeping habit and dense glossy leaves. This tree features small white blossoms in summer.

Street Maps

We have provided a street map view of where Council proposes tree planting take place. Please note that this is not a confirmed map and that the locations for the trees will be confirmed after a full site assessment has been carried out by the contractor.

Bittern Close

See how the street will look after the trees have been planted and matured. Below, you can see a "before" and an "after". The tree in the images is a Trident Maple.

Before: A street view of Bittern Close before the street trees were planted. After: An imagined street view of Bittern Close after the street trees were planted and the trees matured.

Crowbill Place

See how the street will look after the trees have been planted and matured. Below, you can see a "before" and an "after". The tree in the images is a Water Gum Luscious.

Before: A street view of Crowbill Place before the street trees were planted. After: An imagined street view of Crowbill Place after the street trees were planted and the trees matured.

Dilga Crescent

See how the street will look after the trees have been planted and matured. Below, you can see a "before" and an "after". The tree in the images is a Pyrus Ussuriensis.

Before: A street view of Dilga Crescent before the street trees were planted. After: An imagined street view of Dilga Crescent after the street trees were planted and the trees matured.

Pearl Close

See how the street will look after the trees have been planted and matured. Below, you can see a "before" and an "after". The tree in the images is a Golden Rain Tree.

Before: A street view of Pearl Close before the street trees were planted. After: An imagined street view of Pearl Close after the street trees were planted and the trees matured.

Tahoe Place

See how the street will look after the trees have been planted and matured. Below, you can see a "before" and an "after". The tree in the images is a Weeping Lilly Pilly.

Before: A street view of Tahoe Place before the street trees were planted. After: An imagined street view of Tahoe Place after the street trees were planted and the trees matured.

Green Streets - St Clair

Learn about the trees we're planting at St Clair.

Tree Species

Wondering what tree species we're planting as part of our Green Streets project? Check out the list below.

Black Tea Tree (Melaleuca bracteate)

A small native species with a rounded top and dark grey bark. This tree features small fine dark green leaves with spiked tips that are scattered along its thin branches. Soft white clusters of flowering blossoms are displayed throughout spring. The tree’s aromatic oils were traditionally used as a natural insect repellent. Given the local soil and climate conditions, this tree will grow to an approximate height of 4 to 5 metres at full maturity.

Broad-leaved Paperbark (Melaleuca quinquenervia)

A fast-growing Australian native tree that is easily recognisable for its thick paper-like bark and olive-green leaves. Cream coloured bottle brush type flowers bloom from late summer through autumn, attracting nectar-seeking birds like Honeyeaters and Lorikeets. Given the nature of our local soils and climate conditions, we anticipate this tree to grow to approximately 7 to 10 metres high at full maturity, providing a good amount of shade and cooling.

Brush Box (Lophostemon confertus)

An evergreen Australian tree that provides good shade due to its dense covering of dark green, leathery leaves. It produces small white fluffy flowers in spring and summer before small seed capsules are formed. Given the nature of our soil and local climate, this tree is expected to grow up to between 9 to 11 metres.

Brush Cherry (Syzygium australe)

This fast-growing evergreen native will attract plenty of birdlife with its edible crimson coloured berries. The tree's oval-shaped leaves start out as a striking bronze colour which changes to a dark gloss green as they mature. Given the local soil and climate conditions, this tree will grow to an approximate height of 3-5 metres at full maturity.

Cimmaron Green Ash Tree (Fraxinus pennsylvanica cimmzan ‘Cimmaron’)

An exotic deciduous tree with thick deep-green leaves and dark grey bark. Leaves change colour to vibrant tones of orange and bronze in autumn. Given the nature of our soil and local climate, this tree is expected to grow up to between 6 to 8 metres, providing a good amount of shading and cooling.

Chinese Elm (Ulmus parvifolia)

A neatly structured semi-deciduous tree. The tree features a delicate scaly bark and has dark green leaves that turn to shades of bronze and gold in autumn and often remain on their branches throughout winter. Given the nature of our soil and local climate, this tree is expected to grow up to 6 metres.

Crepe Myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica Var. Indian Summer ‘Natchez’)

A spectacular deciduous tree with attractive patterned bark. Dark green summer leaves turn reddish-orange in autumn before falling. Beautiful white flowers are produced throughout summer and autumn providing a spectacular floral display. In St Clair, this tree is expected to grow up to 4 to 5 metres.

Golden Rain Tree (Koelreuteria Paniculata)

A deciduous tree with green leaves which turn bronze to gold in autumn before falling. In summer, chains of gorgeous bright yellow flowers are produced, followed by papery lantern-like seed pods which hang in clusters. Given the nature of our soil and local climate, this tree is expected to grow up to between 5 to 8 metres.

Ivory Curl Flower (Buckinghamia celsissima)

A bird-attracting native tree with a compact rounded form ideal for street tree planting. This tree features soft dark green leaves and spectacular long cascading white flower spikes that bloom over summer. These trees will attract an abundance of pollinators, inviting increased biodiversity to the area. Given the nature of the soils and local climate conditions, we anticipate this tree will grow to an approximate height of 4 to 5 metres at full maturity.

Japanese Elm (Zelkova serrata)

This exotic species is ideal for street tree planting with its upright and uniform branches. It features bright green serrated leaves that turn yellow, and coppery bronze to red putting on a tremendous autumn display. Given the local soil and climate conditions, we anticipate that this tree will reach an approximate height of 8 to 10 metres at full maturity, providing a good amount of shade and cooling.

Ornamental Pear (Pyrus ussuriensis)

A medium-sized deciduous exotic tree with densely spreading glossy green leaves. Over autumn, these leaves change to vibrant citrus tones of lemon yellows, lime greens, and blood oranges. Given the nature of our soil and local climate, we anticipate this tree will grow up to 5 to 7 metres.

Paper Bark (Melaleuca stypheliodes)

A medium-sized native evergreen tree with a rounded canopy. The tree trunk has white to light brown papery bark that peels in layers. It features finely textured dark green pointed spiky leaves and fine, small creamy bottle brush-like flowers in spring and summer. Given the nature of our soil and local climate, this tree is expected to grow up to 4 to 5 metres

Snow in Summer (Melaleuca linariifolia)

An Australian east coast native featuring a dense canopy of thin green needle-shaped leaves. It is also recognisable for its papery bark and masses of small, fluffy cream-coloured flowers that blossom in summer, giving the appearance of snow across the treetops. Given the nature of our local soil and climate, we anticipate that this tree will grow to a height of 6 to 8 metres at full maturity.

Trident Maple (Acer buergerainum)

A lovely medium-sized deciduous exotic tree. In spring, the Trident Maple’s leaves are a beautiful coppery red that changes to a glossy dark green in summer. In autumn, the leaves then turn to a brilliant greenish-red and orange. Given the nature of our soil and local climate, this tree is expected to grow up to between 5 to 7 metres.

Tuckeroo (Cupaniopsis anacardiodes)

This small to medium native evergreen tree is ideal for street tree planting as its dense foliage creates a lovely shade canopy. Featuring dark green glossy leaves and greenish-white blossoms from late autumn, this tree attracts many bird visitors, baring small fruit in early summer. Given the nature of our local soils and climate conditions, we anticipate this tree to reach a height of 5 to 7 metres at full maturity.

Water or Kanooka Gum (Tristaniopsis laurina ‘Luscious’)

An evergreen Australian tree with attractive bark. The leaves are dark green, shiny and large. The new leaf growth is a distinctive copper colour. It bears cream to orange-yellow scented flowers in summer before producing seed capsules. Given the nature of our soil and local climate, this tree is expected to grow up to between 5 to 8 metres.

Weeping Bottlebrush — Dawson River (Callistemon viminalis)

A small native evergreen tree with lovely weeping branches. The leaves are green, long and thin. In spring and autumn, the tree will attract nectar-loving birds that will come to drink from the quantities of bright red bottlebrushes. Given the nature of our local soil and climate, we anticipate that this tree will grow to a height of around 3 to 4 metres.

Weeping Lilly Pilly (Waterhousia floribunda)

A medium to large native evergreen tree with a lush, beautiful weeping habit and dense glossy leaves. This tree features small white blossoms in summer. Given the nature of our soil and local climate, this tree is expected to grow up to between 6 to 8 metres

Willow Bottlebrush (Callistemon salignus)

A small native evergreen tree with soft green elongated leaves. Featuring pale, pink-toned new growth and papery bark. In spring the tree will attract nectar-loving birds that will come to drink from the creamy white to yellow bottlebrush flowers. The flowers are then followed by small seed pods that sit tightly along branches. Given the nature of our soil and local climate, this tree is expected to grow up to 4 metres.

Street Maps

We have provided a street map view of where Council proposes tree planting take place. Please note that this is not a confirmed map and that the locations for the trees will be confirmed after a full site assessment has been carried out by the contractor.

Barrallier Way

See how the street will look after the trees have been planted and matured. Below, you can see a "before" and an "after". The tree in the images is a Weeping Lilly Pilly.

Before: A street view of Barrallier Way before the street trees will be planted. After: A street view of Barrallier Way after the street trees will be planted.

Jorgensen Avenue

See how the street will look after the trees have been planted and matured. Below, you can see a "before" and an "after". The tree in the images is a Weeping Lilly Pilly.

Before: A street view of Jorgensen Avenue before the street trees will be planted. After: A street view of Jorgensen Avenue after the street trees will be planted.

Mulligan Close

See how the street will look after the trees have been planted and matured. Below, you can see a "before" and an "after". The tree in the images is a Ornamental Pear.

Before: A street view of Mulligan Close before the street trees will be planted. After: A street view of Mulligan Close after the street trees will be planted.

Pasadena Place

See how the street will look after the trees have been planted and matured. Below, you can see a "before" and an "after". The tree in the images is a Machurian Pear.

Before: A street view of Pasadena Place before the street trees will be planted. After: A street view of Pasadena Place after the street trees will be planted.

Solander Drive

See how the street will look after the trees have been planted and matured. Below, you can see a "before" and an "after". The tree in the images is a Japanese Elm.

Before: A street view of Solander Drive before the street trees will be planted. After: A street view of Solander Drive after the street trees will be planted.

Our Trees

You may be asking why we’re planting more trees around the Local Government area. More trees mean more shade, cleaner air and more beautiful places to live. But there are many other reasons why planting trees is one of the best actions in creating a legacy of livable cities. We have put together a bunch of resources to help answer this question in more detail.

The Right Tree for the Right Place

A range of native and exotic species have been carefully selected by Council’s landscape architects for planting across the various Greening our City grant-funded projects.

We considered multiple factors to ensure the right tree is selected for the right place.

For residential street planting, this process includes assessing:

  • utility constraints both above and below ground
  • existing infrastructure such as footpaths and boundary fences
  • maintaining safe visibility for pedestrians and driveways
  • the aspect of homes within the streets.

You may notice dwarf and smaller species have been planted where overhead powerlines are present, and a combination of large deciduous and evergreen trees have been planted near open spaces to maximise natural thermal comfort throughout the seasons i.e., allowing the sun to enter homes for warmth during winter and providing shade to cool over the warmer months.

For planting in parks and reserves, increasing shade is the priority. When selecting the tree species, we took into consideration the line of sight from rest areas to play equipment to ensure families can use the space safely and comfortably.

We have taken similar considerations into account with our other Greening our City grant tree planting projects which are taking place throughout the Local Government Area under Council’s Green Grid and Cooling the City strategic plans, with all designs working to complement any existing greenery in the area.

Tree growth rate and expected size at full maturity may differ from the species information that you find on the Internet. We have calculated this tree height according to our local environment and soil conditions to give you an indication of what size we anticipate the trees to reach at full maturity.

How we're supporting the growth of the trees

We're dedicated to implementing sustainable planting practices wherever possible. We've been listening to community feedback and are planting these trees with Waterwell plant collars to help keep lawns clean and make it easier for you when mowing your lawn.

These collars retain moisture at the tree roots, help concentrate mulch and fertiliser on the plant and reduce the amount of watering maintenance required.

The plant collar creates a neat finish when we've completed the planting and will help you easily mow your lawn around your growing tree.

The Waterwell plant collars are reusable and made from recycled UV stabilised plastic.

Benefits of Trees

Benefits of Trees

You may be asking why we’re planting more trees around the Local Government area. More trees mean more shade, cleaner air and more beautiful places to live. But there are many other reasons why planting trees is one of the best actions in creating a legacy of livable cities.

Planting trees has several benefits, including: 1. Trees absorb carbon dioxide from our atmosphere while producing the oxygen we breathe. 2. A 5% increase in tree canopy can lower daytime temperatures by 2.3 degrees Celsius. 3. For every 5% of urban tree
Evapotranspiration is a benefit of planting trees. It involves precipitation, evaporation and transpiration.

What is evapotranspiration?

Plants absorb water from the soil through their roots. The water is later released into the atmosphere as vapour via the surface of their leaves. This process is known as "transpiration".

Water also evaporates directly into the atmosphere from the soil surrounding the plant, including any water droplets on the stem and leaves.

Scientists refer to the combination of these processes as "evapotranspiration".

Plant Deliver-E

Plant Deliver-E

Penrith City Council is calling on its community to help increase urban tree canopy to help cool our City — and we have an easy way that you can be involved!

Research shows that planting trees both large and small is one of the best ways to combat the impact of rising air temperatures in urban areas.

So, we're offering a free plant to residents who want to green their private property and help cool the community. Who would have thought helping your community could be so easy?

All you have to do is...

1. Take a look at our gallery of available plants and pick your top three.

2. Register your top three and provide us with your personal information such as your address.

3. Wait eagerly for our friendly Sustainability team to deliver your tree via our electric vehicle!

Please note Plant Deliver-E is only available to residents who have been notified tree planting is taking place in their suburb. Council will be checking postal addresses and will only be delivering plants to residents who qualify.

Plants available

Please note: To make sure the plants we deliver as part of our giveaway are suitable for all house types/yard sizes, Council is offering a variety of shrubs and small trees. The selected species offer benefits of greening to reduce heat, attract wildlife to yards, and will complement the cooling/ shading of the larger trees being planted on the street/ in parks.

We advise that you carefully consider which plant you select for your property based on their size at maturation.

Sign up!

Please note Plant Deliver-E is only available to residents who have been notified tree planting is taking place in their suburb. Council will be checking postal addresses and will only be delivering plants to residents who qualify.